Back from Bootcamp

I am back from a week (which seemed to go by far too quickly, as all such things do) at the Credimus Bootcamp. I enjoyed the hospitality of Father David van Dijk, and the company of good, intelligent and faithful friends. Many topics were discussed, both in interactive workshops and in lectures, and some may find their way into this blog in due time. But for now I will make do with a selection of photos I took over the course of the week.

My breviary lies ready for Lauds.
Decoration on the ceiling where the nave crosses the transept
Shadowplay in the north transept of the church
Our first guest speaker was Father Marc Heemels. He spoke about the Benedictine monastery of Le Barroux in France
Another workshop was about Gregorian music and its history. Here, diocesan hermit Brother Hugo takes a look at some examples of medieval music notation
Later, Brother Hugo taught us, or tried to teach us, the very basics of Gregorian singing
We had Masses in both forms of the Latin rite. Here Father Harry van der Vegt, cathedral administrator in Utrecht, offers Mass in the Extraordinary Form
Fr. David van Dijk was our host. Here he delivers the homily during the week's first Mass (in the Ordinary Form)
The thurible is lit, ready to incense the Blessed Sacrament
A nightly returning ritual: at the end of an hour of Adoration and Compline, Fr. David gives Benediction
A day trip on Wednesday included a viewing of many religious artifacts, including this medieval manuscript of Gregorian music
A vibrant stained glass window in the church of the Immaculate Conception in Oss, another stop on our trip
The interior of the church of St. James the Greater in the town of Zeeland
A barbecue on the penultimate night, with the weather cooperating exquisitely.
One of Fr. David's two cats says hello

Parable of the Vineyard

‘I am the true vine, and my Father is the vinedresser. Every branch in me that bears no fruit he cuts away, and every branch that does bear fruit he prunes to make it bear even more. You are clean already, by means of the word that I have spoken to you. Remain in me, as I in you. As a branch cannot bear fruit all by itself, unless it remains part of the vine, neither can you unless you remain in me. I am the vine, you are the branches. Whoever remains in me, with me in him, bears fruit in plenty; for cut off from me you can do nothing. Anyone who does not remain in me is thrown away like a branch — and withers; these branches are collected and thrown on the fire and are burnt. If you remain in me and my words remain in you, you may ask for whatever you please and you will get it. It is to the glory of my Father that you should bear much fruit and be my disciples.’

Gospel of John 15: 1-8