Curial changes continue

Ever so gently, the natural process changes the composition of the Curia in Rome. Yesterday, two cardinals retired for reasons of age. Both men, Cláudio Cardinal Hummes of the Congregation for Clergy, and Paul Josef Cardinal Cordes of the Pontifical Council “Cor Unum”, are one year past the required retirement age of 75.

Archbishop Piacenza

Their successors were announced on the very same day. Cardinal Hummes, in a relatively unusual move, is succeeded by the secretary of the congregation he headed for four years. Italian Archbishop Mauro Piacenza, 66, is now the prefect. He is generally seen is an intelligent, levelheaded and honest man. As prefect of the Congregation for the Clergy he will be responsible for the affairs concerning diocesan priests, as well as the legal aspects of running parishes. In February he wrote a letter to Archbishop Eijk of Utrecht, clarifying the latter’s right to regulate employment in his cathedral parish. Archbishop Piacenza again made an appearance in my blog with a letter to all the priests.

Archbishop Sarah

The Pontifical Council “Cor Unum”, which is responsible for all charitable actions and initiatives that relate to the care of the needy, will now be headed by Archbishop Robert Sarah (65). Until now, the Guinean-born archbishop was secretary of the Congregation for the Evangelisation of Peoples.

Both archbishops, as heads of a congregation and a pontifical council, are very likely candidates for the red cardinal’s hat in an upcoming consistory. They’ll then join their predecessors who, not being 80 yet, can still vote in a conclave.

To Mary at Kevelaer we go

Last Wednesday I joined the annual pilgrimage of our parish to the Marian shrine at Kevelaer. I’d never been there but I had heard good stories, so once the opportunity presented itself, I went. There was a full busload, almost 60 people, who went to the popular German town, where Dutch merchant Hendrik Busman built a small chapel in 1641. A prayer card of Our Lady of Luxembourg was later bought by his wife and is now the centre of the devotion at Kevelaer. Both the construction of the chapel and the purchase of the card were instigated by the couple hearing the voice of the Blessed Virgin.

Nowadays, the town is centered around the old chapel with the prayer card, two churches, one of them a basilica, a sacrament chapel and a rectory. Many thousands of pilgrims visit Mary at Kevelaer every year.

Our one-day pilgrimage was started with a Mass offered in concelebration by Bishop de Korte and Father Wagenaar. I was initially supposed to have served, but there were no cassocks in my size, sadly. German men are generally a bit shorter than me, it seems. Instead, I took care of the collection. There was time to look around in the various churches as well as the many shops selling devotionals, before we had a warm lunch at the rectory. In the afternoon we prayed the Stations of the Cross in the park devoted to that exact purpose.

I left Kevelaer with a very positive impression. The atmosphere is very warm in a generally spiritual way and once you immerse yourself in it really feels blessed. I also bought two small medals of St. Joseph, my baptismal saint, who has been a great help recently, even without my initial knowing. I now wear one around my neck, on a silver chain that Brother Hugo was kind enough to give me. The other is worn by my girlfriend, who is responsible for asking St. Joseph for some assistance in the first place.

 

The Marian shrine, in the middle of the square. The original prayer card is kept here.
The beautiful decorations on the ceiling of the shrine
Plaques and badges left behind by groups of pilgrims from all over Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands, dating back to the 19th century
The sanctuary of the 'candle church'.
Lots of candles are burning outside the church on the side of the square
Father Wagenaar at the first Station of the Cross