Anti-life proposals questioned by its ‘target audience’

There is a silent but dangerous initiative going on in Dutch politics. Two groups – the ‘Out of Free Will’ Foundation and the Dutch Society for the Voluntary Termination of Life – are attempting to propose laws to government that would prepare the way for special end-of-life clinics, where ‘patients’ are provided with euthanasia, as well as the lifting of regulations on euthanasia in general for people over 70. Facilitating in death is the start of a very slippery slope, especially when death becomes a standard resolution for someone reaching a specific age.

Logo of the Catholic Elderly Union

Ironically, two unions, the Protestant-Christian Elderly Union and the Catholic Elderly Union, representing the ‘targets’  for these new measures, are now speaking against this. They have written a letter to Secretary of Security and Justice Ivo Opstelten and Health secretary Edith Schipper, warning against this development.

The unions say that the 116,000 signatures that the initiative has gathered are more than a “yes, we are in favour”. It is also a “no against getting old and dependent”. The unions acknowledge that getting older and the approaching end of life triggers emotions of fear and insecurity, and often elderly wonder why they should go on. These emotions and thoughts require that the people in question feel safe in their environment and with their possible caregivers.

The unions conclude their letter with an earnest outcry to the secretaries who are today receiving the ‘Out of Free Will’ Foundation and the Dutch Society for the Voluntary Termination of Life:

It is unacceptable that questions about a full life come from a shortage of dedication and attention from others. Elderly people with a full life must be heard, but thy also deserve someone saying: “Stay with us, you are worth it!”

PCOB and the Union KBO consider the answers from the initiators ‘Out of Free Will’ and NVVR – who plead for an end-of-life clinic – far too blunt. They think that the issue of elderly who consider their life fulfilled is an existential issue. It requires a broad approach and reflection by society.

The original letter can be read in Dutch here.

Surely, such developments as suggested by these anti-life groups are a sign of the moral bankruptcy of this country? This is not a matter of caring for the elderly, it is opting for the easy way out.

Cardinal Burke to speak at St. Agnes

As announced before, Raymond Cardinal Burke will be offering Mass in the Extraordinary Form on 17 September at the church of St. Agnes in Amsterdam. That day marks the fifth anniversary of the FSSP apostolate in that church.

But today Catholica announces that the cardinal will also speak at the annual Catholica conference, on the afternoon of that same day. His topic will be Summorum Pontificum and the Church after Vatican II. The high-ranking prelate is known to celebrate Mass in both forms, and is in many circles considered to be a man to be watched. The 62-year-old Burke was made a cardinal during the most recent consistory and serves as prefect of the Supreme Tribunal of the Roman Signatura, the highest judicial authority in the Church and overseer of the administration of justice in the Church. Before his appointment, Cardinal Burke was bishop of La Crosse (1994-2003) and archbishop of Saint Louis (2003-2008) in the United States.

Catholica is, in the Dutch Catholic media landscape, a voice for orthodoxy, made clear in its advocacy for the Extraordinary Form of the Mass as well as a return to a Catholic practice that has mostly disappeared from the Netherlands. In recent months, it has been a platform for debate about the nature of the Second Vatican Council and how it should be understood and implemented.

Other organisers of the conference are the Benelux region of the Priestly Fraternity of Saint Peter and the Ecclesia Dei foundation in Delft.