Point and purpose – Whispers asks about social media

In a rare appearance of the open combox, Whispers in the Loggia asks what all this social media malarkey actually does for us:

“How do they help on the ground? When are they at their best (and, indeed, their worst)? What more could they do to live up to their highest potential? Or, conversely, what difference would it make if they all just up and vanished?”

Here’s my answer, cross-posted from the comments thread in Rocco Palmo’s exemplary blog:

“I’m a 33-year-old lay Catholic blogger from the Netherlands, have been blogging for little over two years now (well, on Catholic topics at least), and I also use Twitter and Facebook. That’s really it for social media, but I find that not jumping into every new experiment, network or what have you, helps to keep things focussed. The blog is the main thing for me.

I use social media, in the first place, privately. I like blogging and if others find what I write interesting; all the better. It’s tool to keep myself up to date on developments in the Church, and it also challenges me to keep thinking. Blogging’s no passive thing!

Generally speaking, social media on Catholic stuff shows me that I am a part of something big, practically and spiritually. I am not very much limited to my parish or even diocese: there is so much out there, in other dioceses, countries, Rome, elsewhere, that affects us and that we should be aware of and act on or against.

I would not want to miss it, because it serves a great purpose in my neck of the woods, especially when the official Church channels are cutting their budgets when it comes to communication. In that sense, I also feel a responsibility to communicate about faith and Church: if the ‘officials’ can’t do it, it falls to us. We can’t fall silent about our faith.”

Social media is an important frontier in the communication of our faith. The Church is slowly getting to grips with it, as are many faithful (many have been in the business for years already). It’s important to keep up the good work, but also to, every now and then, think about why we do it.

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