The challenge of dialogue – Pope Francis’ first Communications Day Message

Pope Francis released his first Message for World Communications Day today, and while the day itself won’t dawn until 1 June, tomorrow’s feast day of St. Francis de Sales is the traditional date for the release of the Message. Well, we’re only one day early…

world communications day

The Message is quite Franciscan in its content, repeating some of the things he has stated before and containing a clearly-worded challenge for all involved in the media in general, but specifically in Catholic media.

“We have to be able to dialogue  with the men and women of today, to understand their expectations, doubts and  hopes, and to bring them the Gospel, Jesus Christ himself, God incarnate, who  died and rose to free us from sin and death.  We are challenged to be people of  depth, attentive to what is happening around us and spiritually alert.  To  dialogue means to believe that the “other” has something worthwhile to say, and  to entertain his or her point of view and perspective.  Engaging in dialogue  does not mean renouncing our own ideas and traditions, but the claim that they  alone are valid or absolute.”

The dialogue needs to be the next step to take as Catholic communicators. Of course, there will be some who will take Pope Francis’ words in exactly the way he tells us not to: as if we should not hold on to the truths of the faith in our relations and communication with others. But this truth does not always necessarily coincide with our own ideas and desires. It is good to try and make that distinction.

Read the full Message via the link above or in my Dutch translation.

Published by

incaelo

I'm a 37-year-old lay Catholic from the diocese of Groningen-Leeuwarden. I write about the Catholic Church in the Netherlands. I not only enjoy bringing selected developments to the attention of readers, but I also think that it is sometimes important to allow a wider audience to read about the state of the Church in the Netherlands. That's why a fair number of posts about that topic will be translations of Dutch articles, episcopal writings and whatever else.

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