Pope Francis versus the military – strike one for kindness?

anrigI am reading lots of articles about the latest personnel change made by Pope Francis, although it really is the same text over and over. And it’s mostly rumour too…

Earlier this week the Holy See announced the dismissal of the commander of the Swiss Guard, Colonel Daniel Anrig. It was a short announcement, with no details given. Wat we do know, however, is that Colonel Anrig was already serving beyond his original mandate, so a dismissal would have been forthcoming anyway.

But that absence of facts did not stop some from collecting any and all rumours regarding the Swiss Guard and Pope Francis (or rather, the idea of Pope Francis that many still have). Colonel Anrig, they say, was fired for being very strict, for adhering to protocol, for basically being a military commander, and that, of course, does not sit will with the Holy Father, who is all about being nice and kind. After all, he did once shake hands with a Swiss Guard (something that Popes Benedict XVI and Saint John Paul II also did), and told a soldier on guard duty to sit down and eat the sandwich he made for him (or the cappuccino he bought, the rumours are unclear). And Colonel Anrig was the one who taught his soldiers discipline, gave them orders about their behaviour while on duty, and so the Colonel and the Pope clashed. And when the Pope clashes with someone, he fires them.

Well, that’s enough rumours for now. Anyone paying attention to what Pope Francis says knows that he is more than just kind and nice. He is not a stranger to strictness and sacrifice. And while he is known for spontaneous actions, these are often, in time, confirmed by the Holy See or other authorities. The rumours about the sandwich for the guard never has, just like the one about Pope Francis going out into the streets of Rome at night to feed the homeless. They are nice stories, but nothing more.

Pope Francis once warned against the evil of rumour and gossip, which comes from inside and is more destructive than any danger from outside. This is exactly that. A story is fabricated out of the rumours, wishes and distortions that have been floating around for a few years now.

Colonel Anrig was appointed commander of the Swiss Guard in 2008 and could often be seen accompanying the Pope and his entourage,not in his colourful ceremonial uniform but in a dark suit, providing security, which is the single and centuries-old task of the Swiss Guard. Pope Francis has been Pope for more than 18 months now, and will have been in contact with the Swiss Guard almost every single day. Being protected by them will no longer be a surprise for him, nor while the presence of guards outside his residence. The Swiss Guard is a military outfit, with military discipline. Much may be expected from its members, including discipline, protocol, endurance and the free will to give themselves to the protection of Church and Pope.

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incaelo

I'm a 37-year-old lay Catholic from the diocese of Groningen-Leeuwarden. I write about the Catholic Church in the Netherlands. I not only enjoy bringing selected developments to the attention of readers, but I also think that it is sometimes important to allow a wider audience to read about the state of the Church in the Netherlands. That's why a fair number of posts about that topic will be translations of Dutch articles, episcopal writings and whatever else.

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