For a Dutch museum, a letter from the Pope

In addition to today’s great surprise of the upcoming meeting between Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill comes another surprising communication from the Holy Father, this time to a local museum in the Dutch city of Gouda.

MTE5NDg0MDU1NDAyNDgxMTY3Starting tomorrow, Museum Gouda is hosting an exhibition on the late medieval Dutch theologian, priest and humanist Desiderius Erasmus, presenting him as a source of modern ideas like tolerance and freedom of conscience. The exhibition not only gives an overview of Erasmus’ life and work and the Europe of his day, but also shows some personal effects, such as a ring, chalice and Bible he owned.

A unique part of the exhibition is a letter from Pope Francis (probably written on his behalf, judging from the excerpt shared below), in which the Holy Father discusses the meaning of Erasmus’ thought for the Europe of today. While the full text has not been published (you’ll have to go see the exhibition for that), the website of the museum features the following excerpt:

“The Pope prays that the exhibition may show that Christian faith and true humanism are not opposing forces, but that they both serve human dignity. As a believer, Erasmus proclaimed an authentic humanism in a time of great social change. Such humanism is equally necessary in our modern time. Our time is also marked by great social changes. The human person, who needs our care and attention, is of inestimable value. Erasmus reminds us of the necessary solidarity with one another, of the necessity to transcend contradictions and conflicts and the search for a new unity, pluralistic and inspiring, in which the sum is more than its parts. Solidarity is an indispensable principle for establishing social friendship.”

The exhibition “Erasmus: I move for no one” runs from 6 February to 26 June in Museum Gouda.

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Pope Video 2 – Care for our common home

God said, ‘Let us make man in our own image, in the likeness of ourselves, and let them be masters of the fish of the sea, the birds of heaven, the cattle, all the wild animals and all the creatures that creep along the ground.’

God created man in the image of himself, in the image of God he created him, male and female he created them.

God blessed them, saying to them, ‘Be fruitful, multiply, fill the earth and subdue it. Be masters of the fish of the sea, the birds of heaven and all the living creatures that move on earth.’

Genesis 1:26-28

In his second video about his monthly prayer intentions, Pope Francis asks us to take care of what God has freely given to us: the whole of creation. It is our responsibility, not just to use and cast aside, but to care for. We do so for ourselves, the egenrations after us, but also for creation itself: like us, it has been wanted and created by God, and as such it deserves our respect.

Go, see:

An archbishop speaks, but some had rather he wouldn’t

erzbischof_stephan_burger_qArchbishop Stephan Burger, of Freiburg im Breisgau, has been crisitised for an upcoming speaking engagement. Not for what he is going to say, but for the fact that he is speaking.

The Forum Deutscher Katholiken identifies itself as uniting Catholics who are loyal to Pope and Church, and is therefore more traditionally-bent group than some others in Germany. At the end of April they are meeting in the town of Aschaffenburg, and Archbishop Burger has been invited to be one of the speakers. Other prelates attending include Cardinal Joachim Meisner, emeritus archbishop of Cologne, Bishop Friedhelm Hofmann, in whose Diocese of Würzburg the meeting takes place, and Bishop Franz-Peter Tebartz-van Elst, the former bishop of Limburg who is making his first high profile return to Germany since resigning amid the financial scandal there.

Some have taken issue with Archbishop Burger’s presence at this meeting of an orthodox group, and even one where a perceived persona non grata such as Bishop Tebartz-van Elst is also present. The archbishop has defended himself and wonders at the fears displayed by some. He does not automatically share any of the opinions of other guests and sees it as a chance to share his own. Speaking about aid to refugees, he explains, “From a Christian point of view, nothing goes too far when it comes to helping people in need.”

It’s hard to fathom why a bishop attending a meeting of a group of Catholics who express loyalty to the Church is reason for concern or even criticism. Such concepts as tolerance, openness to differing opinions and looking toweards the future (the latter especially when Bishop Tebartz-van Elst is concerned) come to mind.