For a Dutch museum, a letter from the Pope

In addition to today’s great surprise of the upcoming meeting between Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill comes another surprising communication from the Holy Father, this time to a local museum in the Dutch city of Gouda.

MTE5NDg0MDU1NDAyNDgxMTY3Starting tomorrow, Museum Gouda is hosting an exhibition on the late medieval Dutch theologian, priest and humanist Desiderius Erasmus, presenting him as a source of modern ideas like tolerance and freedom of conscience. The exhibition not only gives an overview of Erasmus’ life and work and the Europe of his day, but also shows some personal effects, such as a ring, chalice and Bible he owned.

A unique part of the exhibition is a letter from Pope Francis (probably written on his behalf, judging from the excerpt shared below), in which the Holy Father discusses the meaning of Erasmus’ thought for the Europe of today. While the full text has not been published (you’ll have to go see the exhibition for that), the website of the museum features the following excerpt:

“The Pope prays that the exhibition may show that Christian faith and true humanism are not opposing forces, but that they both serve human dignity. As a believer, Erasmus proclaimed an authentic humanism in a time of great social change. Such humanism is equally necessary in our modern time. Our time is also marked by great social changes. The human person, who needs our care and attention, is of inestimable value. Erasmus reminds us of the necessary solidarity with one another, of the necessity to transcend contradictions and conflicts and the search for a new unity, pluralistic and inspiring, in which the sum is more than its parts. Solidarity is an indispensable principle for establishing social friendship.”

The exhibition “Erasmus: I move for no one” runs from 6 February to 26 June in Museum Gouda.

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incaelo

I'm a 37-year-old lay Catholic from the diocese of Groningen-Leeuwarden. I write about the Catholic Church in the Netherlands. I not only enjoy bringing selected developments to the attention of readers, but I also think that it is sometimes important to allow a wider audience to read about the state of the Church in the Netherlands. That's why a fair number of posts about that topic will be translations of Dutch articles, episcopal writings and whatever else.