Translations update

I have updated the translations pages (English and Dutch) by moving some from the ‘Latest translations added’ list in the left sidebar, and adding a few new ones.

Among the latter are English translations of Archbishop Burger’s piece about the refugee crisis, Bishop Hurkmans’ letter regarding his retirement and, since yesterday, a Dutch translation of Pope Francis’ Message for World Youth Day 2016.

Facebook knows better, even when it’s your name

fb-unlikeIs Facebook going too far by demanding you stick to their rules regarding your name? Over the past months I have seen more than a few people being forced to change the name they use on the social media network, because they are Catholic priests or religious who include their title (Father, Deacon, Brother or Monsignor) in their name on Facebook. The most recent example is noted blogging priest Msgr. Charles Pope, who was locked out of his account and asked to submit multiple pieces of evidence that he is really called that. Or, as Facebook’s rules have it, that that is the name people know him by. It need not be one’s official name, then.

Deacon Greg Kandra, himself a victim of the Facebook name policy, has more details.

Msgr. Pope refuses to accept Facebook’s demands, but others have changed their name, removing the Father, Deacon or Brother from their name, despite the fact that people know them as Father X, Deacon Y or Brother Z.

Facebook, as an independent company, has of course every right to make its own rules. But that does not make them right. The basic rule that people should use their own name(s) is logical, but also very limited. As Deacon Greg points out, Native American users run into the same problems as Catholic priests and religious, and also see their names judged to be not their real ones. The case of a man named Oglala Lakota Brown Eyes who Facebook decided should be called Lance Brown is particularly striking… The entire process of deciding which names are real and which are not seems quite arbitrary and limited.

But, even despite this, the titles of priests and religious are not exactly that. Unlike, say, a doctor, a priest’s title of Father indicates not a profession, but a state of being. This state of being began with his ordination and is forever. Sure, some priests may choose not to use their title, but many do, and rightly say that that is how people know them and relate to them, as Father X (or Deacon Y or Brother Z, as the case may be).

Facebook has a concern for their users’ conduct which may be justified, but goes about it in a heavy-handed, even insulting way for those involved (as, for example, the burden of proof lies with them, not with whoever decides that a name may be inaccurate or even false).

Adopt a Bishop

We’ve seen it before, in the runup to the conclave for example, when faithful could “adopt” a prelate to specifically pray for, so that those prayers may help him in doing his duty for the needs of the Church and according to the will of God. The German website of Church in Need has now done something similar for the participating bishops of the Synod.

They write:

“On 25 March Pope Francis asked the faithful to pray for the Synod and suggested a prayer for that purpose, which you find below.

We also invite you to accompany the meeting in Rome with prayer, namely by praying specifically for a single bishop who participates or who is substitutes when the participant from his country can not.

To ensure that all participants and substitues of the Synod are strongly prayed for and none is “left out” we offer a random selector below, with which you can find a bishop and “adopt” him in prayer.”

joseph werthSo, go here, click on the “Jetzt Siehen” button and see who you can pray for.

I got Bishop Joseph Werth, Bishop of Transfiguration at Novosibirsk in Russia, who will participate in the Synod only if the Russian delegate, Bishop Paolo Pezzi of Mother of God at Moscow, would be unable to.

Who did you get?

Oh, and that prayer that Pope Francis suggested? That’s this one, to the Holy Family:

“Jesus, Mary and Joseph, in you we contemplate the splendour of true love, to you we turn with trust.

Holy Family of Nazareth, grant that our families too may be places of communion and prayer, authentic schools of the Gospel and small domestic Churches.

Holy Family of Nazareth, may families never again experience violence, rejection and division: May all who have been hurt or scandalized find ready comfort and healing.

Holy Family of Nazareth, may the approaching Synod of Bishops make us more mindful of the sacredness and inviolability of the family, and its beauty in God’s plan.

Jesus, Mary and Joseph, graciously hear our prayer. Amen.”

Dr. Peters on WordPress and the art of ‘In Your Face’

An excellent comment from Dr. Peters on the sudden appearance of a rainbow on the WordPress posting page. Dr. Peters is a canon lawyer, but for the purpose of this post he is a fellow blogger on WordPress confronted with “all the lately-found bravery of one who jumps on a bandwagon after someone else has won a fight”.

He writes:

“Mind, WordPress has never, in my three or so years of using it, marked its tool pages with any political logos or symbols of any kind. But today there is an in-your-face gloat over the Supreme Court decision in Obergefell.”


“Yes, a lot of people are happy about Obergefell. I get it. But assuming everyone wants to celebrate it?”

Read the rest over there. Yes, WordPress, you too.

A leaked encyclical

So someone posted an early draft of Laudato Si, the encyclical that is set for release on Thursday. The encyclical is under embargo until noon that day, as the Holy See has been announcing in the daily press bulletins for at least the past week.

In my opinion, leaking such an important document against the clear wishes of the publishers is a very shameful thing to do, even if it is an early draft. That, and the simple fact that the Holy See has again asked everyone to respect the embargo, is the reason why I will not be sharing the text or write about it at this time. Besides, I don’t even know how much this draft differs from the final version, so drawing conclusions now may do nothing but make me look like a fool.

The situation is a difficult one for honest reporters, who have been preparing for next Thursday and want to respect the embargo. There will be many others who will be writing about the leaked text, and many who will be forming opinions before the official text is out. The leak is not only disrespectful to the author and publisher, but also to fellow reporters and writers, professional and amateur.

Shame on all those involved in the leak.

Documenting the moving of monks

I have written before about the planned move of the Cistercian monks of Sion Abbey to the island of Schiermonnikoog. The community is now renting a house where the brothers live in groups of three to scout the terrain and find a new permanent home for their community. On the Sunday of Pentecost, the monks celebrated their last public Mass at Sion Abbey. While they haven’t left that place yet, the monks do not want to host faithful for Masses and prayer services when they can’t guarantee those service to take place on set times.

The big new development in the story, however, is that the entire project will be documented by a film crew, for a documentary that is expected to air sometime in the spring of 2018. Filming has already begun and will last until the end of 2017.

Broeders-strand monnik de film

It sounds to be like a wonderful project to document an extraordinary event like this: monks of one of the stricter orders in the Church not only downsizing, but also looking ahead to the future with a new foundation on an island that is named for them.

For now titled “Monnik” (Monk), the documentary will use the move as a context in which to find answers to some questions. From the summary on the website:

“What moves them to be a monk today, contrary to all the demands of modern society? What are they looking for in this simple existence with possession, no career perspectives, no relationships or family, no autonomy or freedom, no visible successes? What do they find there, hidden behind cloister walls, in the order’s rigid hierarchy, subject to a strict schedule of prayer, study and labour? Did they lose their own identities to the uniformity of the habit?


MONK is a reflection of the timeless spirituality of the brothers at a critical time in their order’s history and in their personal lives. Their existence, filled with many hours of silence and prayer is seemingly pointless. But would this ancient uselessness perhaps not show something of the basis of human existence?”

The makers of the documentary have secured almost half of their expected budget of 200,000 euros. They accept donations via this page.

Translation update: From a retired Pope to a retired Secretary of State

Just a brief notice to say that I have translated the letter that Pope emeritus Benedict XVI wrote to Cardinal Bertone recently. The letter will be featured in the caridnal’s new book, and it is only the second public communication by the retired Pope. I use the German text (which, I presume, is the original text) which can be read here.

Anywa, find ym translation via this link or the sidebar at left.