In prayer

Tomorrow’s big blog post is ready for posting, but for now, just something nice.

tencer bürcherFrom the diocese’s Facebook page, this shot from last week’s consecration Mass of Bishop David Tencer of Reykjavik, with his predecessor, Bishop Pétur Bürcher praying over him.

In Reykjavik, the new bishop arrives

francis bücher tencer
Bishop Bürcher and Bishop-elect Tencer with Pope Francis

For the first time in almost three decades, Reykjavik’s Christ the King Cathedral will host the consecration of a bishop, as Msgr. David Bartimej Tencer, O.F.M. Cap. becomes the fifth bishop of the diocese.

The Mass in which the new bishop is conmsecrated is scheduled for 18:00. Consecrator will be the retired bishop of Reykjavik, Msgr. Pétur Bürcher, and co-consecrators will be  Archbishop Henryk Nowacki, Apostolic Nuncio to Iceland and the other Nordic countries, and Bishop Tomáš Galis of Zilina in Slovakia. Like Msgr. Tencer, Bishop Galis was a priest of the Diocese of Banská Bystrica, and later he became auxiliary bishop of the same diocese before coming to Zilina in 2008. I assume he is co-consecrator to represent his diocese, or because of a personal friendship with the new bishop (or both).

The Diocese of Reykjavik’s website is pretty completely available in English, although pretty frugal in detailed information, but a report on tonight’s consecration may become available in both Icelandic and English soon.

For the north, the closest thing to a native son for bishop

tencerEight months after Bishop Pétur Bürcher’s requested retirement was accepted, the Diocese of Reykjavik gets ready to bid their ten-year bishop goodbye, and welcome a sort-of-native son as his successor. Bishop-elect Dávid Bartimej Tencer, O.F.M. Cap, while Slovak, has been active in Iceland as parish priest since 2004 and that makes him more of an Icelander than any of his four predecessors. The fact that the new bishop is yet to be ordained means that Reykjavik’s cathedral of Christ the King will see it’s first bishop’s ordination since 1988.

In a way this could be considered evidence that Reykjavik is grown up as a diocese, now that it can supply its own bishop. The Church in Iceland is largely an immigrant Church with some 13,000 faithful, and all but one of its priests coming from abroad.

Bishop-elect Tencer was ordained in 1986 for the Diocese of Banská Bystrica in south-central Slovakia, and for the following four years he worked in parishes there. In 1990 he started his novitiate in Order of Capuchin Friars Minor and made his profession the next year. From 1992 to 1994 he studied Franciscan spirituality at the Antonianum in Rome, after which he made his final profession. Back in Slovakia he held various offices within the order, including superior at a convent in Hrinová. In the period between 2001 and 2004 he taught various topics at two seminaries. In 2004, Bishop-elect Tencer came to Iceland and was appointed as parish priest in Reykjavik. Since 2007 he has been parish priest in Reyþarfjörþur and a member of the council of priests of the Diocese of Reykjavik.

Bishop emeritus Bürcher has tried his best to establish religious communities in his diocese, something that Bishop-elect Tencer is well suited to continue.

The Diocese of Reykjavik covers the entire country of Iceland and was established in 1923 as the Apostolic Prefecture of Iceland. In 1929 it became an Apostolic Vicariate and in 1968 a full Diocse. Bishop-elect Tencer will be the 7th ordinary and 5th bishop. His predecessors were:

  • Bishop Martino Meulenberg (Prefect Apostolic 1923-1929; Vicar Apostolic 1929-1941)
  • Bishop Johánnes Gunnarsson (Vicar Apostolic 1942-1967)
  • Bishop Hendrik Hubert Frehen (Bishop 1968-1986)
  • Bishop Alfred James Jolson (Bishop 1987-1994)
  • Bishop Joannes Baptist Mathijs Gijsen (Bishop 1996-2007)
  • Bishop Pétur Bürcher (Bishop 2007-2015)

Bishop-elect David Tencer’s ordination and installation as Bishop of Reykjavik is set for 31 October. Bishop emeritus Pétur Bürcher will remain in office until that date, after which he will divide his time between the Holy Land (where he will focus on prayer as well as organising spiritual exercisies and pilgrimages to support the local Christian communities) and Switzerland (where he will live with the Dominican sisters of St. Peter’s convent in Schwyz).

In Scandinavia, Copenhagen has the chair

The Scandinavian bishops, who form one bishops’ conference spread over five countries, recently met to elect a new president. After ten years, Bishop Anders Arborelius steps down, and he is succeeded by the bishop of Copenhagen, Czeslaw Kozon. He had already been serving as vice-president, a function Bishop Arborelius now takes over in a game of musical Church chairs. The third member of the standing council of the conference is Bishop Teemu Sippo of Helsinki. Other members of the conference are Bishop Pétur Bürcher, whose resignation remains pending, Bishop Bernt Eidsvig of Oslo and Bishop Berislav Grgic of Tromsø.

nordic bishops' conference

^Bishops Sippo, Kozon and Arborelius, with Sr. Anna Mirijam Kaschner, cps, the general secretary, at left

Usually, a bishops’ conference is headed by the metropolitan archbishop of the corresponding Church province (although there are exceptions, and the bishops are not bound by law to elect the metropolitan as president), but since the Scandinavian dioceses do not form a Church province – as there is no metropolitan archbishop – their presidency is not bound by expectation or tradition. That said, the presidency of the Nordic bishops’ conference has never been held by the bishop of Copenhagen. In fact, since its establishment in 1970, the presidency has alternated between Oslo and Helsinki, with Stockholm bookmarking the run until now.