Changes in Münster as Auxiliary Bishop Geerlings retires

23795750_1127524700712501_5423271941249965540_nFive years before reaching the age of retirement, 70-year-old Bishop Dieter Geerlings retired as auxiliary bishop of Münster today. Health issues forced the early retirement. In 2015, the discovery of cancer forced the complete removal of his stomach, but by the end of 2016, the bishop had taken up all his duties again. But the necessary limitations of his physical situation proved to be incompatible with the life and duties of an auxiliary bishop, it has now turned out. Following his doctor’s advice and after consulting with Bishop Felix Genn, Münster’s ordinary, Bishop Geerlings offered his resignation to the Pope in September. Today it was accepted.

Bishop Geerlings, who is the titular bishop of Tacapæ and served as auxiliary bishop of Münster for seven years, expressed his regret at having to retire early. Responding, Bishop Genn stated:

“I am of two minds. On the one hand I am very grateful to Pope Francis for accepted the offer of resignation, because auxiliary bishops and bishops also need to take care of their health. On the other hand we lose – also when Bishop Geerlings will accept certain duties again – an outstanding auxiliary bishop, who in hindsight has been a great support to me. Dieter Geerlings was and is, also as auxiliary bishop, in the first place a pastor. He was and is always very near to the questions and concerns of the people. He is someone who goes to people and has no fear of contacts. With a keen mind and great expertise he analysed the questions which concern us as Church today. He was always led by this perspective: How can we, as Church today, be there for the people in their specific situations.”

Although Bishop Geerlings has now laid down his duties as episcopal vicar for the region Coesfeld/Recklinghausen and is no longer a member of the curia of the diocese or the German Bishops’ Conference (he was a member of the committees for caritas and migration), he remains, when his health permits, available for confirmations and also remains rector of the church of St. Clement in Münster, member of the cathedral chapter and pastor for the non-German speaking Catholics in Münster.

The retirement of Bishop Geerlings sets, so it seems, an already planned change in the ordering of the Diocese of Münster into motion. Until now, the diocese consisted of five pastoral regions, each under the pastoral responsibility of an auxiliary bishop. Citing the decreasing number of priest, Bishop Genn says that, while fewer priests are available in the parishes, things can’t remain as they were at the head of the diocese. Bishop Geerling’s pastoral region, Coesfeld-Recklinghausen, will be split up: Coesfeld will be added to Münster and Warendorf under the responsibility of Bishop Stefan Zekorn, while Recklinghausen will join Wesel and Kleve, which form Bishop Rolf Lohmann’s pastoral area. Borken and Steinfurt (Bishop Christoph Hegge) and Oldenburg (Bishop Wilfried Theising, not on the map below) remain unchained.

 

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With the loss of one pastoral region, Münster will henceforth have four instead of five auxiliary bishops; still the highest number of any German diocese, though.

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Kevelaer provides a bishop again, bringing Münster back to five

This week, the Diocese of Münster saw the its full roster of auxiliary bishops, no less than five of them, completed again. And like the last time, it is the rector of the Marian Shrine of Kevelaer who gets to wear the mitre.

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^Rolf Lohmann, the newest auxiliary bishop of Münster, before the chapel in Kevelaer holding the image of Our Lady, which launched alomst four centuries of pilgrimages.

Msgr. Rolf Lohmann was appointed on Tuesday following the transfer, in April of last year, of Bishop Heinrich Timmerevers to Dresden-Meißen. As mentioned before, there is a strong tradition in German dioceses for the vicars of the various pastoral areas to be made auxiliary bishops. Münster has five of these pastoral areas, and thus also five auxiliary bishops.

Bishop-elect Lohmann will be assigned to the pastoral area of Niederrhein, the southwestern-most part of the diocese, adjacent to the Dutch diocese of Roermond and ‘s-Hertogenbosch (and a small part of the Archdiocese of Utrecht). This includes the old cities of Kleve, Wesel and Xanten, as well as Kevelaer, the major pilgrimage site dedicated to the Blessed Virgin in northwestern Germany, which continues to draw large numbers of pilgrims.

The new auxiliary bishop was ordained in 1989 and served in various parishes until 1997, when he was appointed as rector of the shrine of St. Ida in Lippetal-Herzfeld. In 2007 he became a member of the cathedral chapter and in 2011 he succeeded the then newly-appointed auxiliary Bishop Stefan Zekorn as rector of Kevelaer.

Bishop-elect Lohmann enjoys a close friendship with another auxiliary bishop of Münster, Wilfried Thiesing, who he succeeds in Niederrhein. Bishop Thiesing now resides in Vechta as episcopal vicar for the northern Oldenburg area, but comes from Niederrhein. The friendship between Thiesing in the north and Lohmann in the south should serve to bring the diocese closer together, Bishop Thiesing joked.

The appointment comes at a special time for Msgr. Lohmann. As rector of Kevelaer he has been preparing and looking forward to the 375th anniversary of the Kevelaer pilgrimage, to be celebrated at the end of May and beginning of June. With his new assignment, his role in that celebration will be different than he expected. Bishop-elect Lohmann considers the pilgrimage to be the future of the Church. As bishop, he wishes to continue contributing to a renaissance of pilgrims.

As bishop, Msgr. Lohmann will hold the titular see of Gor, in modern Tunisia. A date for his consecration is yet to be announced, but it will robably be before the summer holidays. Canon law dictates that a bishop must be consecrated within three months after the announcement of his appointment.

Photo credit: Michael Bönte