835 years after his death, Saint Hathebrand comes home

It may not look like it today, but the northern part of what is now the Netherlands, especially the provinces of Groningen and Fryslân, were once a monastic heartland. Much of the land reclaimed from the sea was the result of the work by monks or promoted by them. They established massive monastic complexes, of which the town of Aduard is perhaps among the best known.

One of the monasteries was Oldeklooster (which simply means ‘old monastery’) near the village of Feldwerd, near the shores of the Dollard sea arm. This was established by a man named Hathebrand (although the second ‘h’ in his name is sometimes omitted). Hathebrand’s monastery housed both male and female religious and, after a difficult first start, which, the story goes, even included one or more attempts on the life of its founder, the monastery flourished. Hathebrand went on to establish two more monasteries: Merehusen in East Frisia (now northwest Germany) and Thesinge or Germania in the vicinity of the city of Groningen. According to monastic records, Hathebrand died on 30 July 1183.

In 1594 the fortunes of the monasteries turned. The city of Groningen, which controlled much of the lands surrounding it, fell to the forces of the Dutch republic and quickly became Protestant. The Catholic faith became illegal and the monasteries fell empty. Over time, they turned into ruins which were later demolished. In the countryside of Groningen, there is very little that remains of the once ubiquitous religious foundations.

The remains of Hathebrand, by then deemed a saint, were moved to the Catholic south, ending up in Antwerp. While the north forgot about him, in what is now Belgium he was venerated as a saint and helper in need.  The Belgian town of Mortsel still has a street named after him. The relics of Saint Hathebrand found a final resting place in the church of Kortrijk-Dutsel. And there the story ends. Until recently.

In the words of reporter Reinder Smith, writing for RTV Noord:

“He had stopped hoping. Edze de Boer from Uithuizermeeden is almost 92 years old, and has been looking for Saint Hathebrand for more than fifty years. Last March he received a letter from the parish council of Kortrijk-Dutsel.

[…]

“De Boer was born in Katmis near Holwierde and knew from his youth the stories that there had been a monastery on this dwelling mound. He started to study the history, and so learned that the physical remains of Hathebrand had ended up in Belgium.”

[…]

“Former teacher De Boer had already visited [Kortrijk-Dutsel] in 2002, but the relic could not be found then. But the board of the church of St. Catherine kept looking and after 16 years a small chest appeared from the back of a closet, with in it, among other things, a part of the bones of St. Hathebrand.”

Today, those few remains returned home. Not to Hathebrand’s monastery, which is long gone, but to the dwelling mound of Feldwerd, and then to the church of Krewerd, for a public presentation, including a look back on Mr. de Boer’s search for the long-lost saint, medieval organ music, an address on the rediscovery of the saints following the restoration of medieval churches and the related study of medieval church interiors, and a brief word by Catholic priest Fr. Arjen Jellema.

Saint Hathebrand’s return is a temporary one, however. After a brief visit to his native lands, Hathebrand will return to Belgium.

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At Warfhuizen, the Lord comes home

warfhuizen assumption, brother hugo father jellemaI was struck by this wonderful photo when it appeared on Facebook a few days ago. It was taking at the Mass for the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin at the shrine of Our Lady of the Garden Enclosed in Warfhuizen, and it shows the heart of our faith: Our Lord Jesus Christ under the appearance of bread and wine elevated before his faithful. Holding the consecrated host is Father Arjen Jellema, while Brother Hugo, the deacon hermit of the shrine, looks on.

Brother Hugo and the shrine of which he takes care are currently preparing for his ordination to the priesthood, scheduled for 6 September. For the shrine it means construction work: the altar has been made wider and it will also receive a fresh layer of paint. For the brother it means learning to say the Mass. He will be offering Mass in both forms of the Roman Rite and ad orientem for those parts of the Mass that call for it. Next Saturday, Brother Hugo will begin his retreat in preparation for his ordination. For now, Masses at the shrine are scheduled on weekdays at 7pm, on Saturdays at 5pm (a pilgrim’s Mass for Mary) and on Sunday at 8am.

The Blessed Sacrament has been no stranger at the shrine, of course, but with the celebration of the Eucharist the very centre of our faith and Church has now found a home there.

Photo credit: Marjo Antonissen Steenvoorden

A photo post – Corpus Christi procession in Warfhuizen

Yesterday I took part in the annual procession at the shrine of Our Lady of the Garden Enclosed in Warfhuizen. Usually held in May, practical reasons had it pushed back to June 6, the eve of Corpus Christi (moved to the nearest Sunday in the Netherlands). The procession was preceded by a Mass in the small shrine, celebrated by Father Arjen Jellema, who also carried the Blessed Sacrament in the procession, and the hermit residing at the shrine, Brother Hugo, served as deacon (considering he is a deacon, and a priest come September).

I was pious decoration at the Mass, but announced the presence of the Lord in the procession by continuously ringing altar bells, positioned as I was before the two thurifiers and the Sacrament.

The photos below appear courtesy of Marjo Antonissen Steenvoorde and the student chaplaincy of St. Augustine from Groningen.

mass warfhuizen brother hugoBrother Hugo reads the Gospel

mass warfhuizen
Father Jellema gives the homily

mass warfhuizenMass was celebrated ad orientem, a necessity in the small shrine of Our Lady of the Garden Enclosed

procession warfhuizenLining up the acolytes, servers, deacon hermit, visiting Old Catholic priest and – not least! – the Blessed Sacrament for the procession

procession warfhuizen

procession warfhuizen

procession warfhuizenAn altar of repose was set up at a local farmstead, where a short period of Adoration took place

procession warfhuizen

procession warfhuizen
mass procession
The two thurifers went ahead of the Blessed Sacrament, but did so walking backwards, focussed on the reason for their incensing
procession warfhuizen

adoration warfhuizen

Back at the shrine, there was Adoration

adoration warfhuizen

Father Jellema blesses the faithful with the Blessed Sacrament

New travel companions – two ordinations in Groningen-Leeuwarden

ordination duzijn jellemaA festive day for the Diocese of Groningen-Leeuwarden yesterday, as it gained two new priests. Father Diederik Duzijn and Arjen Jellema were ordained by Bishop Gerard de Korte in the cathedral of St. Joseph. It was the second ordination in two weeks time, following that of diocesan hermit Brother Hugo to the diaconate on 23 January.

In his homily, the bishop spoke about the well-known story of the disciples who travelled to Emmaus. Just like Christ who joined them as a stranger, the bishops said, priests are also called to join the faithful on their way, to both listen to their life stories and explain them in the light of the Gospel.

The bishop also referred to his recent letter about the future of the diocese and asked the new priests to aid the faithful in contributing to building thriving communities of faith. The sacramental priesthood, he noted, is intended to be in service to the entire people of God.

Father Diederik Duzijn is appointed to the parishes around Drachten in the southwest of Friesland, while Father Arjen Jellema will work in the parishes in the southern part of the city of Groningen and surrounding towns, as well as the student chaplaincy. Both priests will offer their first Masses today: Fr. Duzijn in Drachten and Fr. Jellema in the cathedral in Groningen.