Holy Week 2013, an overview of cathedral celebrations

It’s a bit late, but since there is an interest in it, here is the schedule for the Holy Week celebrations in the Dutch cathedrals. As ever, things may change at any time, but since this information is taken from the various diocesan websites, it should simply be accurate.

Diocese of Groningen-Leeuwarden, Cathedral of St. Joseph:

st. joseph cathedralWednesday, 19:30: Chrism Mass
Maundy Thursday, 19:00: Mass offered by Bishop Gerard de Korte
Good Friday, 14:00: Stations of the Cross for children
Good Friday, 15:00: Stations of the Cross
Good Friday, 19:00: Service of the Passion of the Lord
Holy Saturday, 22:00: Easter Vigil
Easter Sunday, 11:00: Mass
Easter Monday, 11:00: Mass

Archdiocese of Utrecht, Cathedral of St. Elisabeth:

catharinakathedraal utrechtWednesday, 19:00: Chrism Mass (at the Church of St Mary in Apeldoorn).
Wednesday, 21:00: Tenebrae and Lauds, followed by silent prayer until 8 o’clock the next morning
Maundy Thursday, 19:30: Mass offered by Cardinal Wim Eijk
Maundy Thursday, 21:30 Tenebrae and Lauds
Good Friday, 8:00: Morning Prayers
Good Friday, 15:00: Stations of the Cross (at the church of St. Augustine)
Good Friday, 19:30: Service of the Passion of the Lord, led by Cardinal Eijk
Good Friday, 21:30: Tenebrae and Lauds
Holy Saturday, 16:00-17:00: Confession
Holy Saturday, 21:00: Easter Vigil, offered by Cardinal Eijk
Easter Sunday, 10:30: Mass offered by Cardinal Eijk
Easter Monday, 10:30: Mass

Diocese of Haarlem-Amsterdam, Cathedral Basilica of St. Bavo:

haarlembavo51Wednesday, 19:30: Chrism Mass (for both the diocese and the Military Ordinariate).
Maundy Thursday, 19:30: Mass
Good Friday, 15:00: Stations of the Cross
Good Friday, 19:30: Service of the Passion of the Lord, led by Bishop Jos Punt
Good Friday, 21:00: Tenebrae
Holy Saturday, 21:30: Easter Vigil
Easter Sunday, 10:00: Mass offered by Bishop Punt
Easter Monday, 10:00: Mass

Diocese of Rotterdam, Cathedral of Sts. Lawrence and Elisabeth:

Rotterdam_mathenesserlaan_kathedraalWednesday, 19:30: Chrism Mass
Maundy Thursday, 19:30: Mass, followed by a prayer vigil until 7 o’clock the next morning
Good Friday, 10:30: Stations of the Cross for children
Good Friday, 15:00: Stations of the Cross
Good Friday, 19:30: Service of the Passion of the Lord
Holy Saturday: 22:30: Easter Vigil, offered by Bishop Hans van den Hende
Easter Sunday, 11:00: Mass offered by Bishop van den Hende
Easter Monday, 11:30: Mass offered by Bishop van den Hende

Diocese of Breda, Cathedral of St. Anthony:

kathedraal bredaWednesday, 19:00: Chrism Mass (at the church of St. Gummarus in Wagenberg).
Maundy Thursday, 19:00: Mass, offered by Bishop Jan Liesen
Good Friday, 15:00: Service of the Passion of the Lord, led by Bishop Liesen
Good Friday, 19:00: Stations of the Cross, led by Bishop Liesen
Holy Saturday, 21:00: Easter Vigil, offered by Bishop Liesen
Easter Sunday, 10:30: Mass, offered by Bishop Liesen
Easter Monday, 10:30: Mass (at the Begijnhof chapel)

Diocese of ‘s Hertogenbosch, Cathedral Basilica of St. John:

264px-Sint-Jans-HertogenboschWednesday, 19:00: Chrism Mass
Maundy Thursday, 19:30: Mass
Good Friday, 15:00: Service of the Passion of the Lord
Good Friday, 19:00: Stations of the Cross
Holy Saturday, 22:00: Easter Vigil
Easter Sunday, 10:00: Mass
Easter Sunday, 11:45: Mass
Easter Monday, 11:00: Mass

Diocese of Roermond, Cathedral of St. Christopher:

kathedraal roermondWednesday, 19:00: Chrism Mass
Maundy Thursday, 18:30: Mass, offered by Bishop Everard de Jong (at the Munster)
Good Friday, 15:00: Stations of the Cross, led by Bishop Frans Wiertz
Good Friday, 19:00: Service of the Passion of the Lord, led by Bishop Wiertz (at the Munster)
Holy Saturday, 20:30: Easter Vigil offered by Bishop Wiertz
Easter Sunday, 11:30: Mass offered by Bishop Wiertz
Easter Monday, 11:30: Mass

Thanksgiving for the Pope – special Masses in the Netherlands and Flanders

benedictMarking the abdication of Pope Benedict XVI, which becomes effective in the evening of 28 February, all Dutch and Flemish dioceses will be offering a thanksgiving Mass for his pontificate. With the exception of Haarlem-Amsterdam and Antwerp, all will do so on the day of abdication itself.

The two metropolitan archdioceses, Utrecht and Mechelen-Brussels, will feature the most extensive celebrations. In Utrecht, a Mass will be offered at 12:30 at St. Catherine’s cathedral, which will be followed by Holy Hour, a sung Rosary, Vespers and Benediction at 6. Whether Cardinal Eijk will attend this day is unclear. Mechelen-Brussels will offer no less than three Masses, all at 8pm: In Brussels by Archbishop André-Joseph Léonard and auxiliary Bishop Jean Kockerols, in Louvain (St. Peter’s) by auxiliary Bishop Leon Lemmens, and in Waver (St. John the Baptist) by auxiliary Bishop Jean-Luc Hudsyn.

The other thanksgiving Masses will take place at 6pm in Bruges (by Bishop Jozef De Kesel), at 7pm in Groningen (Bishop Gerard de Korte), Breda (Bishop Jan Liesen) and Roermond (Bishop Frans Wiertz), and at 8pm in Ghent (Bishop Luc Van Looy) and Hasselt (Bishop Patrick Hoogmartens). All Masses will be at the respective cathedrals of the dioceses, except in Breda, where the Mass will be offered at the chapel of the Bovendonk seminary in Hoeven, and Hasselt, where the Basilica of Our Lady will host the Mass

The next day, 1 March, auxiliary Bishop Jan Hendriks will offer a Mass at 7:30pm, and on 3 March, Antwerp’s Bishop Johan Bonny will offer one at 5pm.

In addition to these Masses, parishes, communities and other societies may of course also mark the abdication with Masses or prayer services.

Holy Week in the Dutch cathedrals

Holy Week i rapidly approaching, and since this time last year I received some questions about Mass times in various Dutch churches for this busiest of times of the liturgical year, below follow Mass times for all Dutch cathedrals, except the cathedral of St. Catherine in Utrecht, for which I have been unable to find a schedule online. If anyone knows more, by all means, share it in the comments.

Cathedral of SS. Joseph and Martin
Radesingel 4, Groningen

Palm Sunday (1 April)

  • 9am: Holy Mass in Latin
  • 11am: Holy Mass
  • 5pm: Holy Mass in Polish

Maundy Thursday (5 April)

  • 7pm: Holy Mass

Good Friday (6 April)

  • 2pm: Stations of the Cross for children
  • 3pm: Stations of the Cross
  • 7pm: Service of the Passion of the Lord

Holy Saturday (7 April)

  • 11:30pm: Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday (8 April)

  • 9am: Holy Mass in Latin
  • 11am: Holy Mass, offered by Bishop Gerard de Korte

Easter Monday (9 April)

  • 11am: Holy Mass

Cathedral Basilica of St. Bavo
Leidsevaart 146, Haarlem

Palm Sunday

  • 10am: Holy Mass, offered by Bishop Jos Punt
  • Noon: Holy Mass for children

Maundy Thursday

  • 7:30pm: Holy Mass

Good Friday

  • 3pm: Stations of the Cross
  • 7:30: Service of the Passion of the Lord
  • 9:30pm: Dark Matins

Holy Saturday

  • 10pm: Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday

  • 10pm: Holy Mass, offered by Bishop Jos Punt
  • Noon: Holy Mass in Indonesian

Easter Monday

  • 10pm: Holy Mass

Cathedral of SS. Lawrence and Elisabeth
Mathenesserlaan 305, Rotterdam 

Palm Sunday

  • 11pm: Holy Mass

Maundy Thursday

  • 6pm: Holy Mass

Good Friday

  • 10:30am: Stations of the Cross for children
  • 3pm: Stations of the Cross
  • 19:30pm: Service of the Passion of the Lord

Holy Saturday

  • 10:30pm: Easter Vigil, offered by Bishop Hans van den Hende

Easter Sunday

  • 11am: Holy Mass, offered by Bishop Hans van den Hende

Easter Monday

  • 11am: Holy Mass

Cathedral of Saint Anthony
Sint Janstraat 8, Breda

Palm Sunday

  • 10:30am: Holy Mass, offered by Bishop Jan Liesen

Maundy Thursday

  • 7pm: Holy Mass, offered by Bishop Jan Liesen

Good Friday

  • 3pm: Service of the Passion of the Lord, presided by Bishop Jan Lisen

Holy Saturday

  • 9pm: Easter Vigil, offered by Bishop Jan Liesen

Easter Sunday

  • 10:30: Holy Mass, offered by Bishop Jan Liesen

Cathedral Basilica of St. John the Evangelist
Torenstraat 16, ‘s Hertogenbosch

Palm Sunday

  • 11am: Holy Mass, offered by Bishop Antoon Hurkmans

Maundy Thursday

  • 7:30pm: Holy Mass

Good Friday

  • 3pm: Service of the Passion of the Lord
  • 7pm: Stations of the Cross

Holy Saturday

  • 10pm: Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday

  • 10am: Holy Mass
  • 11:45am: Holy Mass

Easter Monday

  • 11am: Holy Mass

Cathedral of St. Christopher
Grote Kerkstraat Bij 29, Roermond

Palm Sunday

  • 11:30am: Holy Mass, offered by Bishop Frans Wiertz

Good Friday

  • 3pm: Stations of the Cross, offered by Bishop Frans Wiertz

Holy Saturday

  • 8:30pm: Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday

  • 11:30am: Holy Mass, offered by Bishop Frans Wiertz

Easter Monday:

  • 11:30am: Holy Mass

All this information was collected by me from various parish and diocesan websites, and so may well be far from complete. A Google search or drop by the various cathedrals may give you more and more accurate information as Holy Week approaches.

Goodbye, we’ll keep in touch (via social media)

Pilgrims from the Diocese of Rotterdam bid farewell to family and friends, just before boarding the bus to Spain.

Departures continue, today in the Diocese of Rotterdam (despite initial reports that they would leave yesterday…), whose pilgrims are joined with youth from the Diocese of Paramaribo (who arrived on the 4th in the Netherlands). Meanwhile, with my leaving coming rapidly closer (two more days…), I continue packing. On Wednesday, we’ll start our trip to Zaragoza with a Mass at the Cathedral of St. Catherine in Utrecht, offered by Archbishop Wim Eijk. after which we’ll be sent off with a pilgrim’s blessing. At 4pm we’ll start our journey, with an estimated arrival time in Zaragoza at 2pm the next day. Somewhere along the route, probably within sight of the Pyrenees, we’ll stop to celebrate Mass.

Also in these final days before departure, two new Twitter accounts have popped up, which are welcome additions in the social media landscape of the Dutch Church. Fr. Michel Remery is travelling with the youth from Rotterdam and Paramaribo and keeps a running account of their journey’s progress. WJD Madrid is the account of the RKK, Catholic broadcast and communications organ of the bishops. They’ve been providing a steady and enthusiastic stream of tweets a well. Maybe that will be one of the fruits of the World Youth Days, a n increase in social communications among Dutch Catholics… One can hope.

Photo credit: Peter van Mulken

A new priest for the archdiocese

Karel Donders (left) at his ordination to deacon, pictured here with Archbishop Eijk.

A happy day for the Archdiocese of Utrecht today, as Deacon Karel Donders will be ordained to the priesthood at the cathedral of St. Catherine in that city. Deacon Donders was ordained to the diaconate on 6 November of last year, at which point Archbishop Eijk called that ordination “the first fruit of the cooperation between the archdiocese and the Tiltenberg seminary”. Donders was educated at that seminary, which is where I met him once or twice. During one visit he shared his vocation story with me and other young men attending an orientation weekend. Of his choice to be incardinated in Utrecht despite receiving his education in Haarlem-Amsterdam, soon-to-be Father Donders says:

“I have studied there for six years: very important year of inner formation and desire for the priesthood. After my graduation in 2009 I started a pastoral internship in the parish in Heemstede. A was able to live and work there for a year with much joy. During that year I also made the decision to make myself available as a future priest for the Archdiocese of Utrecht.”

Congratulations to Deacon Donders and the archdiocese, as well as the faithful of the parishes where the new priest will work, on this very important and joyful day.

“Criticism is fine, but slander is a different story”

Words from Archbishop Wim Eijk in response to the ridiculous claims made against him in the Volkskrant. Katholiek Nieuwsblad published a short interview with the archbishop in which he counters these claims. Yesterday the Dutch bishops released a joint statement to the same effect. It’s a shame that that statement and this interview asre not picked up by the major newspapers, whereas the Volkskrant article – a shoddy piece of work – was.

Here is my translation of the interview, conducted by Jan Peeters:

KN: The core element of the criticism which you received this week, seems once more to be the closing of the Ariënskonvikt. As you said you fear in November of 2009, the criticism seems to be leading its own life. Is that true?

Abp. Eijk: “It is true that Ms. Stienstra again proclaims in the media that millions have been left in legates to the Ariënskonvikt, but we don’t have them. I haven’t heard anything about this from others in the past year either – her statement is not true. Once again: the Ariënskonvikt was closed at the time because of the deficient finances and the small number of students, which meant there was not enough of a community life.”

In April of 2011, the Volkskrant repeats criticism which you have tried to refute almost 18 months ago. There must be some truth in it, people may think…

“It remains to be seen if people think that. False accusations do not become automatically ‘true’ because they are proclaimed again 18 months later.”

The prevalent image is that Msgr. Eijk does not allow contradiction and sidelines or fires people who are critical about him. In how far is that image true?

“That image is not based on facts. In various consultation structures and in meetings with parish councils I get continously replies and sometimes also criticism. I certainly take advantage of that, but, on the other hand, I did not become bishop to win the popularity prize. I can’t please everyone. Criticism is fine, but slander is whole different story. Whoever publically calls me a liar has a problem: I can’t work with someone like that. But in all honesty, I don’t think that’s out of the ordinary.”

You are also accused of acting authoritarian, that you do not involve people in decisions, but present them with accomplished facts. You do you see that yourself?

“Upon my installation as archbishop I found a diocese on the edge of bankruptcy. Quick and robust measures were necessary. In such an ‘emergency situation’ there sometimes wasn’t time to garner support, I am aware of that. Because of that promptness people have sometimes felt ambushed by decisions. But in that period there has also always been discussion: with the members of the staff of the diocese, the chapter, the council of priests, the Council for Economic Affairs. By now there is more time for discussion; For example, all the parish council now come by to discuss the pastoral-liturgical policy plans.”

It is well known that your relations with the bishop of Groningen-Leeuwarden were strained when he was still your auxiliary bishop. Later you and your auxiliary bishops have made your complaints about him in a letter that was leaked to the press. What is true about the claim that you wanted to have him removed from office as a bishop?

“That is pure nonsense. In a press release earlier this week, the bishops’ conference have made it know that at no time such a request was made to Rome.”

The accountant of the Diocese of Groningen-Leeuwarden has accused you of an ‘un-Christian attitude’. Is it true that you demanded his resignation?

“No, that is not true. I did, among other things, ask for public apologies for his words.”

It is said you even hired investigators to find the one who ‘leaked’ the letter. Is it true,and did you find the ‘leak’?

“That is a ridiculous accusation. From the archdiocese there has been no contact with whichever investigating bureau whatsoever, let alone that “Msgr. Eijk sent investigators to his bishops to check their computers,” as the Volkskrant wrote. The bishops’ conference distanced itself also from this in a mutual statement. The suggestion was made in cooperation with the Diocese of Groningen-Leeuwarden, to try and find who leaked the letter, for example by hiring such a bureau together. But nothing has come from that.”

 Following the closing of the Ariënskonvikt you are said to also want to close your own cathedral or the St. Augustine church. Is that true?

This too is an urban legend. It is not up to the archbishop to close a church building. It’s the parish that takes that initiative; it owns the church building. The archdiocese did ask the parish council for a thorough finaincial planning for the next several years regarding the buildings. That was necessary because the parish wanted to take a number of decisions which involved large sums of money. That requires the authorisation of the bishop. A long term planning was not suuplied by the parish, which was reason for the Council for Economic Affairs to give a negative advice for now. That can not lead to the conclusion that, as far as the diocese is concerned, one of the churches must be closed; when the parish supplies a good planning, the CEA may still advice positively.”

The former parish house of the cathedral, which until the closing housed part of the konvikt, has to be sold. For whom are the proceeds?

“The parish house is property of the Salvator parish (the parish in the inner city of Utrecht) and the p[roceeds of the sale will fully benefit this parish.”

There are said to be ‘earmarked donations for Utrecht’s seminary. What will happens with that money now that the Ariënskonvikt is closed?

“Insofar as there are ‘earmarked’ donations for the seminary, these will go to the Priesteropleiding Fund. This will pay for the education of the semrians of Utrecht.”

How many seminarians does the archdiocese have and where do they study?

At the moment, the archdiocese has five seminarians. Three of them study at the Tiltenberg, the seminary of the Diocese of Haarlem-Amsterdam. One seminarian lives in the city of Utrecht and the fifth studies at Bovendonk and lives in Breda.”

Is it true that they are not allowed to study in Tilburg? Isn’t that still a vote of no-confidence towards your own Faculty of Catholic Theology?

“Three of the five seminarians may, as a transitory rule, complete their education at the FCT. This is no longer possible for new students. That is not a vote of no-confidence towards the FCT, but it has to do with the disappearance of the link between the Ariënskonvikt and the FCT. At the konvikt the students lived in community and there they received the spiritual and psychological formation which is also part of the education of a priest. To follow classes at the FCT from the Tiltenberg is very difficult due to the distance. And he who studies at the FCT with being rooted in a community lacks the psychological formation. So practical concerns make the FCT no longer an option.”

Did you take notice of the appeal that Ms. Stienstra is to present to the pope against you? In what way is an (arch)bishop free to create policy?

“Ms. Stienstra did not send her appeal to the archdiocese. I can say nothing about it.”